Crowd-funding a short film

Kickstarter for Filmmakers — Is Crowdfunding Right For You?

James Cooper has written an eBook all about Kickstarter, compiling what he learned over the course of his own project. He’s kindly letting us reproduce some of it here for you. Look out for two more excerpts next week, and check out his book at www.kickstarterforfilmmakers.com

Kickstarter For Filmmakers

by James Cooper

Is crowd funding right for me and this project?

Seems simple, and probably a little obvious, but you’d be surprised by the number of campaigns that are launched without ever taking this into consideration. As I said before, crowd funding is not free money, and success isn’t made possible through the simple act of having a campaign. There are several questions to ask that will lead you to determine if you should be pursuing a crowd funding campaign or not:

Is the film interesting to people who aren’t working on it?

This is possibly the toughest question to ask, because people don’t like to consider the idea that they have a project that doesn’t really have an audience. Many filmmakers, are guilty of making films for themselves. This works when you’re footing the bill yourself, but when you’re looking for money from outside sources, you’re going to need elements that hook your potential audience. This may be a killer story, a unique way of making the film (stop motion, green screen, etc.), or noteworthy cast/crew (or anything else you can think of that makes your project stand out), etc. Preferably, you’ll have a combination of things.

The key here is to make sure you have a project that will catch not only the eyes of family and friends, but also their friends, people who follow you on Twitter, and complete strangers that may happen by your campaign by any of a hundred different ways. The longer crowd funding is around, the more widespread its usage becomes, and the easier it is to become lost in the shuffle. It hearkens back to the early 90’s independent film boom: when there were less people out there doing it, it was easier to get attention, but with the advent of digital technology and the numerous DIY solutions, there are so many filmmakers making low budget indies that it requires more and more to stand out. This is quickly becoming the case with crowd funding as well.

The significance of this question grows with your financial goals. As we saw in the statistics, the number of successful campaigns drops significantly every couple thousand dollars you climb, so you really have to take stock of your film as honestly as possible. If you must, ask friends who aren’t afraid to tell you what they really think: “If you didn’t know this was my project, would you be interested enough to put in a few bucks?”

Michael Wiese Productions Crowdfunding for Filmmakers: The Way to a Successful Film Campaign
Book (Michael Wiese Productions)

Looks like there is hope!

by hwnwiz

Hey StinaJ!
I am feeling you... I am still paying off Student Loans and the market is terrible. And it is funny on how you mentioned crowdfunding because I just had a friend raise money for his film and asked if this could be done for student loans and unfortunately it can't... so I searched and searched for something like that and nothing is available. I spoke to him to see if any other sites can be like that and he told me of a group that is focusing on student loans and there has been lots of students that are taking interest... and they are all complaining about loans and being able to pay for school

You might also like:
TRISTEPOLIS SHORT FILM CROWDFUNDING VIDEO
TRISTEPOLIS SHORT FILM CROWDFUNDING VIDEO
THE BEDTIME STORY (Short Film) -- Official Trailer
THE BEDTIME STORY (Short Film) -- Official Trailer

How Entrepreneurs Can Make Environment Cleaner  — The Moscow Times
Of the roughly 500 crowdfunding platforms that now exist, several specifically target clean technologies.

Related Posts